Snow

If you happened to be reading from some parts of the world, you’d probably wonder why a bit of snow is a talking point. If you’re from England, you’ll understand the mix of excitement and devastation this frozen rain can cause.

I’ve not written lately, partly because I’ve begun to lose motivation again, but partly because I’ve literally done nothing noteworthy. I haven’t been finding many jobs to apply for and I’m just plodding along with my course and uneventful work days. But I felt like I just had to write something or the blog would get neglected forever.

So, back to snow. England can go a full year cycle without experiencing even a drop of snowfall, or if it does snow, it lasts about ten minutes and the air temperature is too warm for it to settle anywhere anyway. A few years back we had bad snow, and it stunned the entire nation, causing everything to screech to a standstill. I mean, it was a lot of snow – for us anyway – but the reactions were astonishing. It was literally as though the world had ended, when really we were just calf deep in a bit of cold, semi-solid perspiration. Schools would close, roads would be blocked, accidents would happen, people would feel agitated and uncomfortable – but it wasn’t the end of the world by any means.

Today, we have snow again. It’s nothing like it was on that occasion, but it’s coming down heavy enough that the ground is white – and that’s good enough for us. People don’t just get annoyed or overjoyed when it snows in England – they lose their minds, and don’t pretend you don’t feel something yourself or at least know someone who does. It begs the question really of: Why is snow such a big deal to us? The answer? Because we don’t have it.

It’s funny how the severity of any natural phenomenon is so relative. There have been several snow-related Facebook statuses this morning, and even I’m finding it interesting enough to write about, but in reality, it’ll all probably be melted by the end of the day. And yet in some parts of the world, snow is completely normal. In some parts of the world, ordinary rain is a blessing rather than the burden it is here. Some will find England a freezing country while others will find it relatively mild here.

Relativity applies to everything in life. I just saw a video on Facebook about first world problems, and it’s exactly the same concept. We complain that our phone charger won’t properly reach our bed, while other people’s life would be completely transformed if they could even use a phone at all. Snow in some countries is just life, whereas for us it’s a huge rarity. We get overwhelmed by things that others might find completely ordinary because it’s new to us.

It’s pretty fascinating thinking about these kinds of things, and how different everyone’s lives are. No two people are the same or have the same experiences, and it’s just one of the things that makes this world so amazing. It may not always be fun and everyone may not always agree with each other, but at the end of the day we’re all living on the same planet, and we all have our own priorities and enthusiasm for the occurrences in our lives.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s